DIY Faux Stoneware Salt Cellars

These days, I’m of the mindset that pretty much everything looks better in a speckled stoneware finish, and these DIY faux stoneware salt cellars make no exception.

I, Erin, have been jones-ing for a stoneware cellar in my kitchen for a while now. They’re all-around chic (as far as kitchenware goes!) and handy for decanting specialty spices so that they’re right at your fingertips while cooking. However, I just couldn’t swing the cost of hand-thrown pottery right now, so I dressed up a more affordable cellar with a faux Stoneware finish to elevate the look. This faux finish technique is so darn easy and great anytime you want to create the illusion of handmade pottery.

Are you ready to get your speckle on?

MY LATEST VIDEOS

MY LATEST VIDEOS

Salt Cellar

White Acrylic Paint

Push Pin

Paint Brush, Size 10/0 (Teeny Tiny)

1/8” Thick Painters Tape

Plate or Paint Palette

Paper Towel

1. First thing first, wash all components of the salt cellar. The bamboo pieces need to be hand-washed, but the dishes and spoons can go in the top rack of the dishwasher.

2. Then find an inspiration image on Pinterest of a Stoneware texture you’d like to emulate, use a stoneware piece you have at home or use the pieces I’ve created here as your muse. Once you nail down your inspiration, start with the brush and create a series of random dots on the outside of the salt cellar bowls. Try not to overthink it. You’re going for an all-over splatter vibe.

3. Next, use the push pin to fill in with tiny pin-sized paint dots. Just dip the push pin in paint and lightly dab it onto the surface. Wipe off the pin point with a paper towel in between paint dips. The pin point will give you the smallest paint marks usually created by a brush splatter. Once the entire surface is covered with dots of all sizes, take a second to step back and assess. If there’s an area of too many similar small dots, add a larger dot (and vice versa).

4. Add interest to the accompanying spoon by taping off a spiral pattern on the handle. Smooth out any tape buckling or bubbles with your fingers, and paint in between the tape lines. For this project, it’s a good idea only to paint areas of the salt cellar that won’t come in contact with the spices.

5. Allow everything to “cure” for 21 days prior to washing. Although the dishes are top shelf dishwasher safe, the bamboo pieces are recommended to be hand-washed.

Though designed for salt and pepper, I can see this cellar making a great home for everything from garlic cloves to sugar!

Erin Francois

As a diy-er to the very core, Erin calls upon her interior design background to create pieces for the home that work to add beauty, function and a loaded dose of handmade soul to our everyday.
Find more of her handmade musings on Francois et Mois

Read more from Erin Francois

DIY Faux Stoneware Salt Cellars

These days, I’m of the mindset that pretty much everything looks better in a speckled stoneware finish, and these DIY faux stoneware salt cellars make no exception.

I, Erin, have been jones-ing for a stoneware cellar in my kitchen for a while now. They’re all-around chic (as far as kitchenware goes!) and handy for decanting specialty spices so that they’re right at your fingertips while cooking. However, I just couldn’t swing the cost of hand-thrown pottery right now, so I dressed up a more affordable cellar with a faux Stoneware finish to elevate the look. This faux finish technique is so darn easy and great anytime you want to create the illusion of handmade pottery.

Are you ready to get your speckle on?

MY LATEST VIDEOS

MY LATEST VIDEOS

Salt Cellar

White Acrylic Paint

Push Pin

Paint Brush, Size 10/0 (Teeny Tiny)

1/8” Thick Painters Tape

Plate or Paint Palette

Paper Towel

1. First thing first, wash all components of the salt cellar. The bamboo pieces need to be hand-washed, but the dishes and spoons can go in the top rack of the dishwasher.

2. Then find an inspiration image on Pinterest of a Stoneware texture you’d like to emulate, use a stoneware piece you have at home or use the pieces I’ve created here as your muse. Once you nail down your inspiration, start with the brush and create a series of random dots on the outside of the salt cellar bowls. Try not to overthink it. You’re going for an all-over splatter vibe.

3. Next, use the push pin to fill in with tiny pin-sized paint dots. Just dip the push pin in paint and lightly dab it onto the surface. Wipe off the pin point with a paper towel in between paint dips. The pin point will give you the smallest paint marks usually created by a brush splatter. Once the entire surface is covered with dots of all sizes, take a second to step back and assess. If there’s an area of too many similar small dots, add a larger dot (and vice versa).

4. Add interest to the accompanying spoon by taping off a spiral pattern on the handle. Smooth out any tape buckling or bubbles with your fingers, and paint in between the tape lines. For this project, it’s a good idea only to paint areas of the salt cellar that won’t come in contact with the spices.

5. Allow everything to “cure” for 21 days prior to washing. Although the dishes are top shelf dishwasher safe, the bamboo pieces are recommended to be hand-washed.

Though designed for salt and pepper, I can see this cellar making a great home for everything from garlic cloves to sugar!

Erin Francois

As a diy-er to the very core, Erin calls upon her interior design background to create pieces for the home that work to add beauty, function and a loaded dose of handmade soul to our everyday.
Find more of her handmade musings on Francois et Mois

Read more from Erin Francois

Comments

  • Ashley LaMar

    03.24.18

    Oh, I’m so trying these! That sound so simple and they are absolutely adorable.

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